50 Common Cognitive Distortions

A giant list of ubiquitous cognitive distortions.
Published on January 17, 2013 by Alice Boyes, Ph.D. in In Practice
cognative
Becoming mindful of these common cognitive distortions will help you understand yourself and other people better, and improve your decision making.
1. Personalizing.Taking something personally that may not be personal. Seeing events as consequences of your actions when there are other possibilities. For example, believing someone’s brusque tone must be because they’re irritated with you. (Tips for not personalizing.)2. MindreadingGuessing what someone else is thinking, when they may not be thinking that.

3. Negative predictions.

Overestimating the likelihood that an action will have a negative outcome.

4. Underestimating coping ability.

Underestimating your ability cope with negative events.

5. Catastrophizing.

Thinking of unpleasant events as catastrophes.

6. Biased attention toward signs of social rejection, and lack of attention to signs of social acceptance.

For example, during social interactions, paying attention to someone yawning but not paying the same degree of attention to other cues that suggest they are interested in what you’re saying (such as them leaning in).

7. Negatively biased recall of social encounters.

Remembering negatives from a social situation and not remembering positives. For example, remembering losing your place for a few seconds while giving a talk but not remembering the huge clap you got at the end.

8. Thinking an absence of effusiveness means something is wrong.

Believing an absence of a smiley-face in an email means someone is mad at you. Or, interpreting “You did a good job” as negative if you were expecting “You did a great job.”

9. Unrelenting standards.

The belief that achieving unrelentingly high standards is necessary to avoid a catastrophe. For example, the belief that making any mistakes will lead to your colleagues thinking you’re useless.

10. Entitlement beliefs.

Believing the same rules that apply to others should not apply to you. For example, believing you shouldn’t need to do an internship even if that is the normal path to employment in your industry.

11. Justification and moral licensing.

For example, I’ve made progress toward my goal and therefore it’s ok if I act in a way that is inconsistent with it.

12. Belief in a just world.

For example, believing that poor people must deserve to be poor.

13. Seeing a situation only from your own perspective.

For example, failing to look at a topic of relationship tension from your partner’s perspective.

More:

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-practice/201301/50-common-cognitive-distortions

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The work programme – a £527 million failure

Vox Political

The government’s flagship work programme stood revealed as an abject failure today, when the Department for Work and Pensions admitted only around three per cent of jobseekers have found “sustainable” work.

Of the 878,000 people who joined the programme, only 31,000 found a job for six months or more.

The figures mean as many unemployed people are finding sustainable jobs on their own – and are staying in employment six months after joining the work programme – than if the scheme had never existed.

There was “no direct evidence of movement into sustained employment”.

Ministers have, of course, refused to accept that the scheme is a failure – despite it reaching only three-fifths of its 5.5 per cent target (3.53 per cent) – and are claiming it is taking longer than expected to succeed. The next set of figures will be better, they claim. They said it was “early days”.

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IDS off the hook with ICC – so evidence needed of Atos deaths

Vox Political

People whose family members have died while going through the DWP/Atos work capability assessment are being urged to contact a disability specialist – who has been seeking international legal action against the austerity-enforced injustice.

Vox Political reported back in September that Samuel Miller had contacted the International Criminal Court in The Hague, intending to file a complaint against Iain Duncan Smith, Chris Grayling and Maria Miller, the ministers at the Department for Work and Pensions, considered most responsible for “draconian welfare reforms and the resultant deaths of their society’s most vulnerable”.

Mr Miller got in touch over the weekend, but said that the result had been disappointing: “They stated that the International Criminal Court has a very limited jurisdiction. The Court may only address the crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes as defined by Articles 6 to 8 of the Rome Statute.”

The Rome Statute is the document…

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20 Commandments for Mental Health workers

  1. Thou shalt respect your client and not judge;
  2. Thou shalt increase the well-being, opportunities and happiness of your client;
  3. Thou shalt be in time for appointments and ‘phone calls. It will show your client that he matters;
  4. Thou shalt have a well-chosen and well-timed sense of humour;
  5. Thou shalt reconsider your ‘professional distance’ if it makes your client feel he stands alone; Show that you are a person too.
  6. Thou shalt not let your bad mood or personal issues influence your professional attitude;
  7. Thou shalt have an open conversation if your client is suicidal and give good support and protection if necessary;
  8. Thou shalt not hide behind a newspaper on the ward or make any other unapproachable impression otherwise;
  9. Thou shalt not hide and chat in the nurses’ offices but be with your clients as much as possible to create a safe and friendly environment;
  10. Thou shalt consider family and good friends of your clients as team players (unless it’s impossible) and support them well in the interests of your client;
  11. Thou shalt inspire and support your colleagues to make mental healthcare as good and friendly as possible and ask and give feedback on a regular basis to become a ‘winning team’;
  12. Thou shalt inform your clients well about side effects of medication, observe well and help to find solutions if needed;
  13. Thou shalt not avoid the subject ‘sexual side effects of medication’;
  14. Thou shalt help your client to get good dental and physical care and support them on doctor and dentist visits if needed;
  15. Thou shalt help your client to exercise on a regular basis (walk, run, cycle etc) to increase their health
  16. Thou shalt support your client to overcome financial or housing problems and fight bureaucracy;
  17. Thou shalt listen well to the client’s aspirations for their life and give support to achieve them;
  18. Thou shalt stand up for the rights of your client;
  19. Thou shalt fight the stigma of mental illness on every opportunity;
  20. Thou shalt help your client to keep up hope.

Kindly shared from NurseWithGlasses her blog can be found here:

http://20commandments.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/20-commandments-for-mental-health.html?showComment=1334191432257#c1294111232518715636